We Vs C


Faraz Khan Art Studio at Grounds for Sculpture. RWJ  Hospital, Hamilton, New Jersey.

On June 3rd and 4th of 2017, I participated in Robert Wood Johnson Hospital’s campaign called we versus cancer to celebrate success stories of cancer survivors. I enjoyed mingling with people and writing their names in Arabic calligraphy. I also got to write inspirational words from cancer survivors and their families on a large scroll between two mirrors. This scroll is going to be hung at the hospital where patients and their families who are going through cancer treatment could be inspired by these motivational words. I consider it my good fortune to be involved in this campaign. I praise the organizers for doing everything to make the guests feel comfortable. For example, they had iftar Garden, for Muslims to break their fast, halal food, and prayer space. For me, it was a reward in itself to see people’s face light up when they saw an inspirational quote written in English or their name written in Arabic calligraphy. 

Image: Inspirational Words in Arabic

Jessica, her beautiful name in Arabic.

This was the scroll full of inspirational quotes.

Paint Night on Dec. 31st at ISCJ

Image: Artwork by students, Paint Night program at Faraz Khan Art Studio, Princeton.

Paint Night with Faraz Khan

ONLINE REGISTRATION IS CLOSED

YOU COULD STILL JOIN US FOR THE PAINT NIGHT @ ISCJ – $39 at the door (while supplies last – 7 more spots!)

When: Sat, December 31, 5pm – 7pm

Where: Islamic Society-Central Jersey, 4145 US-1, Monmouth Junction, NJ 08852, USA (map)

Description: Bring the JOY! Art brings Hearts Together.

Find your friends and have an amazing time at the Islamic Society of Central Jersey’s “Paint Night”. Enjoy a mother-daughter, father-daughter, BFF night or come alone and make friends. Come join us at the ISCJ.org on Sat. Dec. 31st from 5:00pm – 7:00pm. The Paint Night program is only $29 per person (all materials included). Faraz will teach painting backgrounds and calligraphy. You will walk away with a beautiful handwritten calligraphy/painting with your name (or the name of your loved ones). Each artwork will be unique. No prior painting experience required. For more on what Faraz Khan does, please check out his website here: http://www.farazkhanartstudio.com/blog

Money Back Guarantee!

Why Not? If you are not satisfied with the program at the end of the night, you could simply ask for a refund.

Limited Seating!

$29 – Online Registration Ended on Friday, 12/30/16

You could still JOIN PAINT NIGHT at ISCJ $39 – At the door

(while supplies last)

 

Also Check out our weekend Art Program in Princeton studio on the blog below!

 

 

December 2016 – WEEKEND ART CLASSES for Youth & Adults!

One-day FLASH SALE!  ❂ WARM WINTER ART CLASSES❂

“Thanks to Faraz Khan, our children and adults no longer have to search for creative Islamic art program.”Shomail M.

“Faraz’s beginner calligraphy class is a great introduction and taught in a very friendly and encouraging way, great for all ages.” Merziyah P.
“This [art program] brought out the artistic side in me. It was an incredible introduction to Arabic Calligraphy.”Yasir M.

 

Program: LEARN PAINTING & ARABIC CALLIGRAPHY

12240061_10153099190106073_2373723577883736865_nDescription: Do you know there is a world of a difference between Arabic writing and calligraphy? Students will review the fundamentals of pen strokes, dot-based measurements, balance, lettering and design in Arabic Calligraphy. This is an essential class for any student who wants to learn the easy steps to remarkable calligraphy in a short time. The emphasis in this class will be on learning how to create your own Arabic calligraphy home décor items.

PROGRAM AGE 6+
Time: Saturday or Sunday, 10:30 am – 11:30 am. Open Enrollment. (includes four sessions per month) – FREE SUPPLIES INCLUDED!

Flash Sale: $97* Today Only

Regular Price: $129 

 

Register Now – ONLY TODAY!
Student Name & Age
Enter Saturday/Sunday option



 

 

 

Faraz Khan Art Studio.com

195 Nassau St. Suite#22

Princeton, New Jersey, USA

My Advice to Aspiring Artists: V. How to Turn Failures into Learning Curves

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My Advice to Aspiring Artists: V. How to Turn Failures into Learning Curves

By: F.K. Art Intern Nimah Bhura

Everyone fails in life, whether it’s in school or at work. Sure, you might be the best at your job or the smartest student in school, but, there will always come a point in time when you make a mistake. It’s true, that mistake can scar your entire career, but only if you let it. Your mistakes should aid your success, rather than regressing it.

As an artist I’ve experienced multiple failures, but I haven’t let them stunt my growth. Instead, I’ve used them as a learning curve; I understood what I did wrong and improved my technique. Although it takes effort, the second try is always better than the first. Next time you mess up or make a mistake, study your failure and try again.

Author’s Bio: I am a High School student just trying to learn more about art. I own 5 galleries and over 100 pieces of my work are featured all over the world— I wish. I am just trying to communicate a message to anyone who will listen, even if that is just my parents.

My Advice to Aspiring Artists: IV. Learning Step by Step

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My Advice to Aspiring Artists: IV. Learning to Go Step by Step

By: F.K. Art Intern Nimah Bhura

There is always an order in which one does things. A series of steps is essential to success. One doesn’t just wake up one day and master an art form. There is always a starting point and an ending point, and in between are several steps that lead you to be great. Steps help periodically break up an amount of work, and they help a you fully master a skill.

When learning the art of Arabic calligraphy, I first began by going through all the letters. I vigorously practiced them until they were perfect, or close to it. Next, I began forming words from the letters I had learned. I learned how to connect letters so that they were proportional and in sync. Finally, I moved on to sentences; I was taught how create a line of harmonious words and letters that created utter beauty. These steps were vital in my development as a calligrapher. Steps provide a starting point and milestones of improvement that help determine your level of skill, and that help you become better at what you are doing.

Author’s Bio: I am a High School student just trying to learn more about art. I own 5 galleries and over 100 pieces of my work are featured all over the world— I wish. I am just trying to communicate a message to anyone who will listen, even if that is just my parents

My Advice to Aspiring Artists: Trying New Techniques

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My Advice to Aspiring Artists:

III. Trying New Techniques

Trying new things is always hard. It’s especially difficult because you are delving into the unknown. The new process or technique you are trying could result in magnificence or it could be a colossal waste of time. However, it is important to take that step and leap into the unknown, because without it improvement is just  a fantasy.

Starting off, new techniques are always difficult to learn and master. They seem impossible, and you’ll always find a reason not to try them. Whether you argue that it is because your existing technique is working fine, or that you are satisfied with your work, I can assure you that that logic is unacceptable. New methods of artistry might be frightening, but they are always worth it. Even if the approach ends up being unsatisfactory, you will gain an understanding of what to do and what not to do. Sometimes you have to turn every stone to find exactly what you’re looking for.

Author’s Bio: I am a High School student just trying to learn more about art. I own 5 galleries and over 100 pieces of my work are featured all over the world— I wish. I am just trying to communicate a message to anyone who will listen, even if that is just my parents.

My Advice to Aspiring Artists: Separating What You Know from What You Are Learning

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My Advice to Aspiring Artists: II. Separating What You Know from What You Are Learning

By: F.K. Art Intern Nimah Bhura

There is never just one way to do something, however, there is a proper way. When studying Arabic calligraphy, I was introduced to about a dozen new scripts. Some of them were completely divergent, while others were more alike. I was already familiar with the standard Arabic script, Naskh, and assumed my calligraphy would be flawless right off the bat. To the contrary, I was in for a surprise.

It quickly became apparent to me that what I had learned and what I was being taught were completely contradictory. I realized that there were major differences, mistakes, that I had been taught to write with. This made it exceedingly strenuous for me to completely master the basic script of Naskh. I had to erase what I had previously learned and teach my hand how to correctly write the script. Although it was hard, it wasn’t impossible; and eventually what I was trying to remember became second nature.

Thus, just because you’ve been taught one way to do something your entire life that doesn’t mean it’s the right way. Always be open to new ideas and critiques of your work. If you can’t accept the bad with the good, you’ll never learn and your work will never improve.

Author’s Bio: I am a High School student just trying to learn more about art. I own 5 galleries and over 100 pieces of my work are featured all over the world— I wish. I am just trying to communicate a message to anyone who will listen, even if that is just my parents

My Advice to Aspiring Artists: How to Deal with Hitting the Wall

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My Advice to Aspiring Artists:

I. How to Deal with Hitting the Wall

By: F.K. Art Intern Nimah Bhura

We all have that one thing we love, that we’re great at. For me, it’s art; I believe I’m a great artist. However, that belief doesn’t hold strong all the time. There is always a process in which people do things. While the activity might differ, the process remains relatively similar.

First, you start by fully believing in yourself; you fantasize the task at hand to be minimally difficult, and you begin. You start the activity; in an artist’s case you may start to paint. After a while you take a step back and realize what you’ve created is complete garbage. There are no polite words that could describe your work. That is when you hit the wall. You’re frustrated, so you start over and come up with new ideas to fix it. In any case, you keep going; you never give up when hit with obstacles. Finally, after the frustration, sweat, and tears, you look back and see a masterpiece. Hitting the wall is pivotal, it separates the good from the great; thus, when you reach that wall don’t turn back, but persist.

Author’s Bio: I am a High School student just trying to learn more about art. I own 5 galleries and over 100 pieces of my work are featured all over the world— I wish. I am just trying to communicate a message to anyone who will listen, even if that is just my parents

 

The Blue Quran

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Leaf from the Blue Quran showing Sura 30: 28-32, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

The Blue Qur’an

By: F.K. Art Intern Nimah Bhura

The Qur’an, unlike any other book, is extraordinary. From what it says to how it is written, it encompasses brilliance. Although most people focus on the magnificence of its message, its appearance is equally as striking. The best representation of the Qur’an, is known as the Blue Qur’an. Most scholars agree that it was probably created in North Africa for the Great Mosque of Qairawan.

The writing of the Blue Qur’an is done in Kufic calligraphy, and is written in gold ink on indigo paper. Being about 600 pages, the Qur’an is thought to have been scattered during the Ottoman Empire. Now, most of it resides in the National Institute of Art and Archaeology Bardo National Museum in Tunis. The remaining pages were sold in auctions for over $800,000. The Blue Qur’an, with its unique colors and valuable materials, reminds people of God’s true majesty.

Author’s Bio: I am a High School student just trying to learn more about art. I own 5 galleries and over 100 pieces of my work are featured all over the world— I wish. I am just trying to communicate a message to anyone who will listen, even if that is just my parents

Symmetry in Islamic Art

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Symmetry in Islamic Art

By: F.K. Art Intern Nimah Bhura

Have you ever looked at a piece of Islamic Art and wondered, “why am I so drawn to this piece”? Islamic Art, especially that which includes calligraphy, is meant to represent absolute beauty and perfection. As it is made for the sake of God, it represents the artist’s love for Him. That beauty is brought to the human eye with the use of symmetry.

Symmetry does not just apply to the format of the calligraphy, but the patterns that are used around or within it. Artists use geometrical patterns made up of an array of shapes to create intricate designs. They distinguished Islamic Art from all other forms of art by duplicating, combining, and interlacing patterns to create extraordinary designs. The complexity of the resulting pattern represents freedom and perpetual growth. Symmetry is one of the defining features of Islamic Art.

Author’s Bio: I am a High School student just trying to learn more about art. I own 5 galleries and over 100 pieces of my work are featured all over the world— I wish. I am just trying to communicate a message to anyone who will listen, even if that is just my parents.

FROM THE BLOG

 

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ABOUT FARAZ KHAN

I express my intellectual longing for creative ideas through Islamic art by fusing colors, lines, dots, and words together to inspire a meaning worth imagining. My work explores universal values of love, life, faith, prayer, beauty, and divine that synthesizes feelings and pictograms through lettering.
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© 2017 Faraz Khan Art Studio.